Natural Sculptures on the Beach

Where we live, the sea tries as hard as it can to move the sand and pebbles down the coast to enlarge the vast pebble wasteland at Dungeness.
     Seaside towns try to stop this by building groynes, or breakwaters.
     Did you know that the strict definition of a groyne is a structure running down the beach and out to sea, while a breakwater runs along the beach, parallel to the shore?
     Over time, the constant beating of the sea against these structures grinds them down into fantastic shapes. Different coloured bits of rope and net tangle themselves around the wood, and small stones get stuck in strange places....
     The weathered wood has inspired and intrigued many artists and photographers. Here are some of our pictures, and a few paintings of local scenes by artists we like.
Rye Harbour

Rye Harbour

Pett Level

View of Eastbourne

Dilapidated groyne in blue sea - Eastbourne

Pett Level

Winchelsea Beach

Winchelsea Beach

Winchelsea Beach

Winchelsea Beach

Winchelsea Beach

Rather rude? Winchelsea Beach

Winchelsea Beach

Rye Harbour

Eastbourne

Pett Level - I like the stones stuck here

Eastbourne

Paul Nash - Dymchurch 1935

John Piper - Littlestone on Sea 1936
Paul Nash - Winchelsea Beach 1934

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